Bake for them two

canstockphoto9505469In Jesus’ time, the nation of Israel was under Roman rule. The Israelites were allowed to live there and practice their faith for the most part, but they had to pay taxes to Caesar and obey the Roman laws.

To the Israelites, the Romans were evil and ungodly. They had no place ruling over God’s chosen people in God’s chosen nation. That land had been promised to Moses and his descendants when God brought them out of Egypt. Their very presence in the land was blasphemous.

One of the Roman laws stated that any man could be required to drop what he was doing and carry a Roman soldier’s equipment for him for up to a mile. In the Sermon on the Mount, with his followers gathered around him, Jesus referenced that law and told his followers what they should do in that case:

“If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.” ~Matthew 5:41

Go with them two miles. That was not the advice that most of the people in the crowd that day had been hoping for. That was not the conclusion that they would have come to on their own, following this man that they hoped would lead them to victory over the Romans. That was certainly not respecting their religious beliefs — go with them two! What if their neighbors saw! What if seeing them carrying the Roman’s equipment caused other Jews to think the Roman oppression was okay? What if there was other work that needed to be done — good work, charity work even, but they spent all that time carrying equipment for the evil oppressor? But Jesus is not worried about any of that:

“If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also,” he said. “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well. If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles. Give to the one who asks you, and do not turn away from the one who wants to borrow from you. You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you greet only your own people, what are you doing more than others? Do not even pagans do that? Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

Christians, our Jesus said, “Go with them two.”

If you believe gay marriage is immoral (I don’t, myself) and a gay couple comes into your shop and asks you to bake a cake for their wedding, what should you do? If God causes the sun to rise and the rain to fall on the wedding days of straight and gay couples, then what is our responsibility? If it is against the law to discriminate against people based on their sexual orientation, but you believe strongly that their lifestyle is immoral, what should you do?

Christians, our Jesus said, “Go with them two.”

If you are wondering if it is worth being sued and losing your business to stand up for what you believe is right, if you miss the look of hurt in the couple’s eyes when you refuse them and only see an angry, media-driven, ACLU-led mob attacking the small business owner who is only standing up for what you believe in, what should you do?

Christians, our Jesus said, “Go with them two.”

Jesus said, not only should you follow the law of the land — the law which in America for the most part prohibits discrimination against people because of their sexual orientation — not only should you do the minimum you have to do, you should go the extra mile. (Yes, that’s where that expression comes from!) Do *twice* what the law requires.

If someone forces you to bake a cake for a gay wedding, bake for them two.

Christians, our Jesus said to not only follow the law, but to rise to a higher standard of love. Christians should be the FIRST people baking cakes — for everyone who asks us. We should be known for our cake baking. People should be saying, “There go those crazy Christians again, baking cakes for everyone. They just won’t quit!” Then, when we share the reason for our wild, all-inclusive love, people will want to hear it. “Let your light shine before others,” said Jesus, “that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.

Christians, when we dig our heels in and insist on our right to discriminate, we are hurting people — we are hurting so many people, so deeply. Behind the ACLU and the liberal media are real people, who have been hurt again and again in the name of Christ. Christians, you and I have hurt them. I know most of us have really good intentions, but we are making Jesus the last thing they want to hear about.

If we “snatch one person from the fire” by refusing to condone behavior we believe is immoral, but send hundreds and thousands of others fleeing churches and Christianity entirely, what have we really accomplished? Someone else will make that cake and fewer and fewer people will look to Christianity for love and hope. We will have won a battle that we were never called to fight in the first place, but lost the war.

*****

Friends, after receiving more than 1500 comments this past week, I’m closing the comments section on this post. I want you to know that I value all of you who took the time to leave a comment, even those who disagreed with me, and especially those on all sides of the issue who vulnerably shared their stories of hurt and healing.

If you would like to read other Christians’ perspective on this issue, or find places for further discussion, I have shared some resources that have been helpful to me here: BFTT follow up and resources.

If you are curious how I came to support gay marriage and full inclusion of LGBT Christians in the body of Christ, you can read about that here.

If you have felt rejected or unloved by Christians or the church because of your sexuality or gender identity, please read my post We choose you.

And please check out Faithfully LGBT and their wonderful photo series of LGBT people of faith.

Love,
Jessica

824 comments on “Bake for them two

  1. Connie says:

    Beautifully said. I don’t have any issue with same-sex marriage, but I firmly believe, as a Christian, that love and compassion should be shown to all. Thank you. Maybe this will get some people to thinking….

    Like

  2. Tyrone says:

    I appreciate irenic discussion. With all due respect, as I appreciate it, the Roman government was a monarchy…I could be wrong as I’m no historian. Ours is a government of, by and for the people. While we ought to obey the laws of the land, it is we who, through our elected representatives, decide our laws. So in comparing how we ought to behave under our government, which is still being decided as evident by our infighting, to that of a monarchy is a categorical error.

    While Jesus did encourage his followers to turn the other cheek, to pray for our enemies, to give up our coat to a theif, to forgive continually and to go two miles, this was in context to being sinned against. Jesus, Geraldeaux, never EVER encouraged his followers to facilitate, participate and approve of sin!

    To love the sinner and hate the sin is no logical contradiction. Unlike a square circle, it is entirely possible to do this. For example, if a Christian were to refuse to bake a cake celebrating what violates his concience and deeply held religious beliefs, he can still bake a thousand birthday cakes for the SAME COUPLE.

    Furthermore, asking a Christian to define christianity is highly presumptuous that he has the authority to do so and invites the no true Scotsman fallacy. Only an authoritative source can define christianity.

    Solamente Geraldeaux!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mark Green says:

      I am sorry to say that if you refuse to bake the cake the perspective customer wants but offer something he does not want you only add insult to injury. That couple wants a wedding cake not a thousand birthday cakes. Speaking for myself I would say once you refused the wedding cake I would be through with you as a bakery.

      Like

    • Polly says:

      Absolutely correct!

      Like

    • Hi Tyrone, thanks for your comment. I would just say that in my experience, it is very difficult for someone to hear “hate the sin but love the sinner” as love. The hate comes through loud and clear, but the love is often not felt. And this is especially true when the thing we are calling a “sin” is as much a part of the the person as his or her sexual orientation. Christians think we are being loving by using that phrase, but it hurts. We need to dig deeper and SHOW our love, rather than putting it into a facile little phrase that gets us out of the long, hard work of it.

      “People generally suppose that they don’t understand one another very well, and that is true; they don’t. But some things they communicate easily and fully. Anger and contempt and hatred leap from one heart to another like fire in dry grass. The revelations of love are never complete or clear, not in this world. Love is slow and accumulating, and no matter how large or high it grows, it falls short. Love comprehends the world, though we don’t comprehend it. But hate comes off in slices, clear and whole — self-explanitory, you might say. You can hate people completely and kill them in an instant.”
      ~Wendell Berry, in Jayber Crow

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    • A gay wedding is not a sin. This is allowing for the flawed notion that homosexual acts are sinful. The wedding does not facilitate the sin: I assure you, homosexual acts happened before it was possible to have such events publicly. The wedding merely allows people who love someone of the same gender to do so more safely with their humanity and dignity intact. Christ never desired someone be harmed for their sins in this life: He made that abundantly clear. Top say there should be no wedding is the equivalent of throwing the first stone.

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    • Angi says:

      Rome was a republic, not a monarchy…

      Like

    • Jessie says:

      Hi Tyrone,

      I appreciate what you’re trying to convey. As far as I know, the phrase “love the sinner; hate the sin” is not in the Bible. It is something that portions of society have created and adhered to in order to try to understand what they should do and how they should react to people who commit acts that they believe to be wrong. I think that Jesus demonstrated loving sinners without caveats. To hate a sin is to decide that you yourself will not commit that sin, but I don’t believe it to be a legitimate basis to discriminate against others who do not share the same beliefs… even if this is in regards to beliefs about sin. I think that the “bake two” concept is precisely what Jesus would be advocating for without modification.

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    • Tami Cobb says:

      Sensibly spoken, Tyrone.

      Like

  3. Petar says:

    In general, I do see your point of practicing love. And yes Jesus did say those things you reference. But He also clearly noted what love is and that love sometimes means speaking the truth if what one is doing is not tot God’s righteous and just standard, regardless of the type of infraction. Sadly, I do believe that we Christians often fail to approach a subject in truth AND love, but are rather quick to condemn and I firmly believe that saddens Jesus as much as a sin itself. Before I get “slammed” with condemantion, please note I refer to sin, any sin, in general. The other thing I would note is that the Bible states if the law of the land is in conflict with God’s law, a Christian is to obey God’s law, not the land’s law. This would be seen in the story of disciples where they are before the Sanhedrin and are confronted with the same question to which they respond with a statement they are to follow God’s law, not that of man.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. mojo911 says:

    Reblogged this on Life & Times after Daddy BooBoo and commented:
    This is what I try to say to people when they get on their “Jesus Box” about me “promoting” homosexual acceptance in society. I think she says it best!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. William Tracy says:

    Thank you this puts it so greatly. I wish others would follow this solid advice. This is what truly SHOWS our beliefs.

    Like

  6. Gary says:

    Got an even better scripture for you…. Jesus told us that the two greatest commandments were to love God with all our heart, soul, etc. and to love each other… Love trumps everything else in scripture and is actually the fulfilling of all the laws… thanks for your teaching….

    Like

  7. Bilbo Fagernackle says:

    I would like to respectfully disagree with you. I haven’t read all the comments so I’m not sure if this has been said nor am I responding to anything said in previous comments. That being said I believe you make somewhat of a point but I personally think it’s taken out of context. Jesus obviously isn’t calling us to persecution of others. But I feel like you’re saying that Matthew 5 is calling us to go the extra mile to show our (Christians) support for gays and gay marriage. Which I believe is wrong. God calls us to be Jesus to them and show them Christ through us, which I believe the majority of Christians don’t do very well and something we should definitely improve on. But nevertheless, He explicitly says marriage is between man and woman. And I don’t think there are any exceptions to that.

    Also, I don’t believe you have the right to say that gay marriage is not immoral. Everyone is allowed to their own opinion of what is right and wrong. But gay marriage is immoral according to the Bible, which is what we as Christians were given by which to live our lives. Our “guide to life” of sorts to put it simply. And I don’t think that any of us have the right to change or twist or put an asterisk by any of what is said in the Bible.

    These are my opinions and my interpretations. Obviously God speaks to us in different ways and makes us interpret things differently. I am in no way attacking or discrediting anyone’s faith. Because I have no right to. And I do not hate gay people. I have a gay family member whom I am very close with. This just the way I choose to interpret what God has said and how I choose to live my life.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Polly says:

      I agree, Bilbo, and I believe you can take it even a step further. Our interpretations may be different, but God’s truth is the same for everyone. If we differ in our interpretations, then one of us is wrong. God promises that if we seek, then we will find. As He has proven Himself to always be faithful to His promises, we can know that if we seek His truth, we will find it. Continuous, open-minded study of God’s Word will bring the faithful believer to God’s truth.

      Like

    • Pat Brown says:

      Can you please pinpoint the specific verse that condemns monogamous, homosexual, intimate, loving relationships? As a Christian, knowing the exact location of this crucial piece of information would help me. Similarly, if we cannot pinpoint the verse I will still grow.

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    • There are two things in concern of “is gay marriage immoral?” First, I find the argument weak scripturally. See Matthew Vines on YouTube for a conclusive discussion on the matter. Secondly, in knowing those who are homosexual, bisexual, etc., you can learn quickly that they love just the same as any heterosexual. When they are persecuted for who they love it is no different than when an interracial, cross religion or any other couple is persecuted for their love. There is no love in such persecution, only pain and misery. I don’t serve a God of pain. I concluded some time ago that there is no hellfire hot enough to scare me into persecuting others. If I am damned for protecting love and human dignity, I go with no regrets.

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    • Mike says:

      Bilbo–
      (1) RE: MATTHEW 5 IS CALLING US…
      You say that going the second mile showed love to the Romans; but “going”
      the second cake is showing approval. Why isn’t it showing love for the same-sex couple.
      Was carrying the soldier’s cargo showing approval? I think not. Why then for the odd couple?

      Like

  8. Ray Hooker says:

    This is well-meaning but it misses some key points. Showing God’s love does involve kindness but it does not always involve agreement. I think the boundary line is where you actually endorse the activity. So if you provide a cake for them basically decorated generically but without attribution “Matt and John Forever” or perhaps even supplying and lovingly placing two statues of a man or woman… that seems to me to be the dividing line. The example came up of a supposed Christian in Colorado that asked the baker for a cake and to write “God Hates Gays”. The baker offer to provide the cake and even the writing materials but refused to write those words on the cake. They complained to the Civil Right Commission about the baker. This seems a little bogus though it was shared on a Christianity Today article. Still it does illustrate the point. We can be kind and not discriminate, yet not have to explicitly endorse a person’s activities we do not agree with. As for the actual text itself, you can’t generalize scripture if you do not take into account the actual context. The two cloaks was responding to real need. In the case of the two miles, it was responding to a civic obligation by serving more. You have to keep in mind that it does not apply to anything that people ask of us nor try to force us to do.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. Reblogged this on spinningonthewebb and commented:
    Beautifully written. I seriously am in love with this post. We can’t share this message enough! Thank you to Jessica for saying this in a way that was so wonderful. I love your message and I am so happy to have found this and be able to pass it along.

    Like

  10. Steve says:

    I shared this and another article who was inspired by it at http://momastery.com/blog/2015/04/06/support-your-right/ Too many Christians are following a church who no longer follow in the footsteps of Jesus.

    I appreciate your article. Thanks.

    Like

  11. […] today’s blog idea came from. I read a blog yesterday called Ten Thousand Places, the post was Bake For Them Two, go head check it out; I can wait. No, it’s really good – go read […]

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  12. I have felt this should be the response of Christians, but I didn’t quite have the words. Thank you for writing this post. I do believe this is how Jesus would respond…those were His words — to go the extra mile. We are to serve everyone with love and humility.

    I think of the Samaritan woman — she had how many husbands??? Yet, He took time to reach out to her. He didn’t just walk by her and ignore her. What a great example we have to follow!

    Like

  13. Kimbrough Leslie says:

    A wonderful response to much of the hateful messages around the issue.

    The only problem I have is that I’m not sure the analogy is applicable. Jesus was speaking to an oppressed people who were daily forced to serve a hostile occupying force. Christians are NOT being oppressed in the U.S., in spite of unsupported contrary claims by some.

    And often missed is the power of Jesus’ advice. To walk an extra mile is to turn the tables and take charge of the situation, saying, in a sense, “No, I will not carry your load for a mile, but I will carry it for two.” Likewise, to turn the other cheek is not to be a “doormat,” but to force the abuser to slap with the flat of the hand, not the back, forcing them to treat you as an equal, not an inferior.

    There should be no expectation that the prevailing culture must adapt to Christian beliefs, not even considering what’s “Christian.” That happens to be contrary to the U.S. Constitution’s protection of both churches and government from each others’ interference. It’s essentially theocracy, which oppresses others. Acceptance of the Good News of God’s love in Jesus the Christ must be completely voluntary, as the Anabaptists and other martyrs recognized early on.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Cameron says:

      I’m glad you pointed out the turning the other cheek point. It was essentially a sign of not backing down and sort of an “F” you. A point most Christians miss and consider it a passive approach to persecution. But I think the blogger’s point still holds weight under this analogy. Though Jesus was telling them not to be pushovers, Jesus’ examples were still non combative. He was telling them to respond not out of fear nor retaliation in the volatile sense. We also can see this through Christ’s sacrifical and servant leadership models. The analogy holds because it’s the call to not give a combative response to things we don’t agree with.

      Like

      • cgreen453 says:

        At the time of Jesus, the cheek was a symbol for relationship. By “turning the other cheek” after being struck, the person was saying they wanted to retain a relationship with the one who struck them. This aligns with Jesus’ teaching to love our enemies.

        Like

    • Sarah says:

      “forcing them to treat you as an equal” Please cite references for your claims here. The Jesus I meet in the Bible is not about being equal to your peers, but wants us, Christians, to have servants’ hearts.

      Like

    • Mike says:

      Kimbrough,
      Pls tell me where you get the idea that slapping with the palm (“flat of the hand”) is reserved for an equal, and the back of the hand is for the inferior. Jewish? Bedouin? Middle Eastern?

      Like

  14. Jason says:

    Just to clarify what I am saying. Jesus sat and ate with prostitutes and tax collectors. He loved sinners. We should to. Personally I would bake the cake, and find something tactful to say that communicates the gospel. I simply wanted to state that things aren’t always so back and in these circumstances, and we need to make sure we proclaim mercy and grace without sacrificing truth. The verse the author uses from Matthew 5 has good historical context, but I feel the author lifts it out of the passage and misses the meaning behind the larger passage as a whole. Jesus was talking about not fighting back when someone wrongs you and you have every right to do so. Being asked to bake doesn’t really fall into that category, so I think a different passage of scripture would have better served this article. But either way, she came to the right conclusion. 😉

    Like

    • Di Browning says:

      So true. I have seen many comments justifying discrimination based on the fact Jesus says homosexuality is a sin, but he did not ask his followers to discriminate against or persecute those who live in sin. He loved the sinners as well and tried to bring them to Christianity with love. It’s time we follow the bible and let people be judged when they are in front of their maker. It is not our place to render judgment.

      Like

  15. Jason says:

    Agh typo! I meant to say “black and white”, not “back and in”.

    Like

  16. Zach says:

    Jesus was a carpenter. If somebody hired him to carve an idol, don’t you think he could have declined but still treated the person with love and respect?

    Liked by 8 people

    • Tim says:

      He wouldn’t have declined. He would have made the idol, spoke his peace on the subject, and wished his customer well on their way. He was cool like that.

      Like

    • carpenters build houses. If a pagan couple asked him to build them a home, I can PROMISE you without a doubt in my heart that there would BE a house build. But if he didnt, Id imagine he wouldnt say it had anything to do with God or immorality

      Like

    • David says:

      EXCELLENT POINT!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Janet says:

      He would carve the idol….

      Like

    • Faye Ku says:

      Perhaps, but you don’t really know what he would have done. Perhaps he would have carved it anyway, knowing that the idol has no real power and a carving isn’t going to replace Him.

      Like

    • Faye says:

      In my opinion this is an almost perfect analogy. WWJD? I think we know that He would not condone, choose to encourage or participate in idolatry or any other sin. Still a God of Love? Yes.
      He said, “Go and sin no more.” In my opinion that’s the bar we should all strive for. Thank God for Grace and Love.

      Like

    • Who’s to say that he wouldn’t have carved that idol and let the client decide for himself/herself to worship as he/she saw fit?

      Like

  17. Kevn says:

    Thank you for writing this. As a Christian condemning his own, It’s the first passage that’s put me at ease since this debacle started.

    Like

  18. Tony says:

    I began to read your post here and I was startled by a comment. I quote, “If you believe gay marriage is immoral (I don’t, myself).” As a christian I can understand why someone who is not a christian would say that, but when someone who says I am a christian makes a statement like… I’m startled by it. So my question is how did you come to the conclusion that gay marrige is not immoral ?

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  19. Hi again! I linked your article from mine because I want others to hear your voice! Thanks again for sharing what is on so many Christian’ hearts!

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  20. Cates Harrington says:

    So much verbiage …..I recently read something beautifully simple but powerful. If you don’t like gays, don’t be gay. If you don’t like republicans or democrats don’t be one. If you don’t like tattoos, don’t get one – you get the idea! Make your choices but realize that’s what others are doing, too, and they wish to be free to make their choices just as you do! What about embracing diversity to learn another point of view? But back to the cake, we’re talking about selling a cake to someone gay right? … for them to enjoy it, maybe buy more, tell their friends, increase the baker’s revenue and following ….the baker won’t lose his straight status by selling the cake and might create a whole new demographic of customers – I sell a high end linen canvas to professional oil painters and don’t see how the artist’s life style preferences would affect my desire to sell my product. What am I missing here? Or is this just “you’re” different from me and therefore I only want to be with, sell to and associate with clone-like versions of myself?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kim says:

      So well said!!!!!

      Like

    • Virginia says:

      Baking a wedding cake is more like *painting* on the canvas, not just selling the bare canvas, no matter how fabulous and high-end it might be. [I’m an artist and stretch my own, so I’m not denigrating in the least what you do! I *love* a good canvas!] But if I were to craft the cake with all the appropriate decorations, it would need some rejoicing and some celebration going into the baking, too…and that could be hard to muster, if I basically disagree with the thing celebrated. I could sell them a cake mix, though. 😉

      I *don’t* run a bakery, though, so–though I’ve thought long and hard about this issue–I’m not sure what I would do if “required” to bake a “gay wedding cake.” Realistically, I’d probably bake the cake and put it together, and if there was decoration specific to that event, recommend they take the nearly-finished cake to someone who could do a better job. Some things I just *couldn’t* do; it’s not a matter of *wouldn’t*…or so it seems to me.

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    • Commentator says:

      No. This seems to be a common misunderstanding. The hypothetical Christian baker objects only to participating in supporting the particular expression of a religious ceremony to which they take issue. A matter of conscience in that circumstance.

      Like

    • MJ says:

      I think the distinction is what kind of use it has. If someone wanted to buy your canvas to paint child porn on it, or a portrait of their child bride, would you sell it to him? This is NOT to say that homosexuality is equivalent with pedophilia (not any more nor any less than any other sin is also equivalent with it, such as ignoring a need or yelling at your spouse, to pick two other examples. Sin is sin is sin). I’m just linking the two to use an example that most people would have a strong negative emotional and moral response to, to give some idea of the response some hypothetical (or real) bakers may feel on the topic of baking a cake to celebrate a homosexual marriage. Personally, I’m not sure where I stand on this choice. Since I don’t provide any wedding-related service, it’s pretty hypothetical for me. But I think I would err on the side of serving them in love rather than refusing service to highlight truth, unless I felt the Holy Spirit telling me it’s a specific time to speak up about the issue and take whatever comes. What comes after such a refusal then might be a lawsuit or “strike on the cheek” or whatever and then the passage might apply a bit more (as people have been complaining that it doesn’t). Anyway, I hope this helps, and I appreciate the chance to work through it a bit more in my own mind and heart.

      Like

    • Todd Fuqua says:

      “If you don’t like gays, don’t be gay?” That demonstrates a fundamental unwillingness to understand that being gay is not a choice. You either are or aren’t. I think that’s at the heart of why there’s so much controversy.

      Like

  21. Emily says:

    I just want to say thank you for writing this. It is really encouraging to hear someone love like Jesus does. And to me, that’s the whole point. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on this subject. May you be blessed!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Sihegee says:

    Agree with Svein. It’s practicing spirituality that makes the difference. Not wearing a badge of religion.

    Like

  23. jdubbery says:

    I loved the article. I loved the paraphrase. I disagree with its application to the current social situation.

    I don’t take “bake for them two” to mean that people should be forced to do what they don’t want to do. Love should fuel our actions. A cake baker should be allowed to choose who they should bake cakes for.

    Perhaps Jesus was not imploring people to follow the rules really well, but to not let the rules be the reason to show people love. The baker’s love of Christ should compel them to bake for all.

    The great chasm in this argument is government imposition vs christian attitude. In other words, you shouldn’t HAVE to bake the cake. But you should.

    Not for me though, i’m more of a pie person myself.

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  24. B Rhodes says:

    If the question is “How should you respond *when forced* to bake said cake?” then I agree.
    If the question is “Should they be forced to do so in the first place?” then I say “No.”

    Making that distinction really clear would have been helpful. The quotation from Jesus does not address the second question. Perhaps you didn’t mean to address it either. But in the context where the second question is being asked everywhere, it would have been good to make that really, really clear.

    Liked by 2 people

    • GldnGrmCrkrTrvsT says:

      Should the Jews have been required to carry the equipment of a Roman soldier for a mile?
      -No
      However, Jesus said to carry it for two.

      Like

  25. Lynne Schultz says:

    This is wonderfully put-thank you!

    Like

  26. Barb says:

    Thank you for putting into biblical perspective something I have been struggling with since I became a Christian.

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  27. Bonnie says:

    Amen!

    Like

  28. Rob says:

    you said you don’t believe gay marriage is immoral. I recommend you read Romans 1:26-27 and 1Corinthians 6:9-11. I enjoyed the article. Christians need to serve all people. We have to quit isolating ourselves and pushing people away. A cake is a cake.

    Like

  29. tyler says:

    Many of you are starting from a place of assuming that a loving, stable same-sex relationship is sinful and bad. Your skipping past that part as if it’s decided and moving on to ‘should I bake the cake or not bake the cake’ or whether the government should be able to force you to do so. I think this blog makes it abundantly clear what a Christian should do, but I’d still encourage you to take a step back and examine why you feel these perfectly healthy and natural relationships are sinful. With as much information that has been posted here about digging into the original text and context of the passages used to condemn homosexuality, the debate seems far from settled. Plenty of theologians have concluded that said passages most likely do not refer to a monogamous loving same-sex relationship. Add to that Jesus never mentioning anything on the subject, and I think you have a hard time finding a righteous leg to stand on. If that’s not enough, pay attention to all the LGBT commenters here and listen when they say their sexuality was not a choice for them. To suggest otherwise is to admit that your heterosexuality was a choice. If homosexuality is not a choice, and it’s not, then it follows that a person must be made or formed that way. I see no evidence to the contrary.

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  30. Bret Simmons says:

    Bake two, deliver the cake, and offer to wash all the feet of the guests while you are there. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Aileen McEleney says:

    I’m not religious, or gay. I don’t even like cake that much. But I do try, every day, both at work (I’m a nurse) and in my personal life, to treat people as I would like to be treated. With respect, dignity, charity, patience and love. It’s quite simply how I was raised. It’s why this post caused me to stop scrolling and read to the end _ because it speaks of tolerance, inclusion, understanding, the building blocks of some better world for all of us. And that has to be a good thing, right?

    Liked by 1 person

  32. sam says:

    Perhaps if you view providing the service that someone comes into your place of business looking for as being “forced” to provide, then maybe you shouldn’t be in that business in the first place. It’s a privilege to serve a customer – not a chore. Basic Business:101.

    Like

  33. listenupcupcake says:

    Beautiful. ❤ :')

    I'm not a religious or a churchgoing person, nor have I been for decades – but if the sentiment so succinctly expressed by the author were more prevalent among the "righteous churched," I might be persuaded otherwise. Thanks for reminding us that humanity is not about legalities, but love….

    Like

  34. Ramona Stagner says:

    Thank you for your post. It was wonderfully written. We need more Christ in the Christians and less judgmental posts online.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. GldnGrmCrkrTrvsT says:

    Fantastic entry. This is a great reminder not just in regards to the LGBT community, but with all those we disagree with. Makes me realize, I too, need to go the extra mile. Thank you.

    Like

  36. jj says:

    Beautiful sentiment. I agree we need to be more about what we are for and less about what we are against. Our message of Christ love is over shadowed. The media has taken our desire to live our faith and turned it into a message of condemnation. No one wants to here a message of condemnation….But that’s not really what the bakery was saying though was it? They didn’t refuse to bake the cake because the couple purchasing it was a gay couple and they believe God doesn’t want them to bake for gay people. They refused to have their cake the representation and celebratory center point of what is an immoral situation in their God’s eyes. I think that makes it different scenario all together-and that’s not hateful. Also in considering the situation, I am reminded of the women caught in adultery and brought before Jesus. We all know the story. “Let he who has no sin throw the first stone.” but what did Jesus say next? “Women , go ahead and keep sinning-have all the adultery you can get-I got your back” No. He said “go and sin no more”. So while I agree serving this gay couple with kindness and baking two cakes would have been a beautiful expression of Christs love and mercy, is that it? Is that the end of the message? Is that all Christ would have us do? Bake the cakes, send them on their merry way and keep quiet? How do you minister in that situation? Do we have the responsibility to minister at all in that situation?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Rhonda says:

      Well said!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lyn Anderson says:

      A few things: the Bible is many men’s interpretations of the word of our Lord and many Bibles don’t say anything about LGBT. The cake is not a center point of a wedding. I have never been to a wedding that has a cake. The cake is at the reception later. And it isn’t the center point there, either. Lately, it’s only been a thing to shove in your spouses face, which I don’t care for, but to each their own. The cake is the dessert to have after your meal. Also, I don’t think 10 out of the 150 people at my reception even knew where my cake came from. And unless I was in the wedding party, I didn’t know where other peoples cakes came from. Remember, “Judge not…”

      Like

  37. Im gay, and I am a non-christian. I can not begin to express how deeply moved I am by this WONDERFUL example of what I have always understood to be TRUE Christianity. You restored a bit of my faith that your camp IS mostly Good people. Thanks for this. A Profound Thanks.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jim S says:

      Jake, You missed a major point about Christianity. We are not “good people”. We are sinners and have fallen short of goodness. That is why we need Christ. That is why we choose to follow his lead.

      Like

  38. Greg says:

    I love what you have to say- I want common ground with Christians but have had such a hard time with them. I knew I was an atheist from about age 12, when the Catholic Church turned against young males like me who were thoughtful, kind and trusting. I didn’t even know what a gay person was until very late in life- maybe college, but I have always felt kinship and trust for those who are marginalized and beat down. I don’t understand the calloused attitude that so many Christian leaders have towards their fellow humans. And to those who claim reverse discrimination…please, really?!
    We all came from stardust- we’re all related.
    Anyway thanks for your post!

    Like

  39. As the mother of a gay teen, I see the world changing for the better. My child is living her true life, as a caring, loving, intelligent young woman who has much to say. Soon she will start her University life, and study Creative Writing on the West Coast. She has worked hard for this, and gives it her all. She also does this on a daily basis with everything, from making other students believe in themselves, helping her teachers any way she can, supporting fellow writers within her group and so much more.
    Who am I or anyone else to deny her to give love or receive love? If you met her or knew her you would have no idea she were gay, you would know that she would be an amazing friend to you, she would help you be a better person. She would help you, make you laugh, be with you and again so much more.

    My point is that she lives her life, and she will leave you to live your life. When you call upon her to help you with something she will not deny you based on you loving a man or a woman. So why would you?

    You would be lucky to have her a your friend.

    I love my daughter.

    Like

  40. K C says:

    As a Christian, I’ve been raised with the belief homosexuality is a sin. But, no sin is greater than another. So lying is a sin, adultery is a sin, lusting is a sin. It is our humanity which wants to judge and determine a higherarchy of sin. If the gay man or woman chooses to conform to a life without a partner, but does not receive Jesus, does that mean they are saved? No. If a compulsive liar stops lying, but does not receive Jesus, is he saved? No. So why don’t we just stop hurting our fellow man and begin to love as Christ loved us? When people are saved and filled with the Holy Spirit, they will know what God would have them change. Just as God shows me my own sin and lovingly redirects through conviction – not condemnation – he will do for all Christians. It is my belief that as a Christian, I focus on my own walk, and share the gift of Jesus with others. Because of this, I would gladly bake a cake for anyone who entered my store because it is just another opportunity to share God’s love and truth.
    God so loved the world, he gave His only begotten son.
    But… We won’t even love the world enough to bake a cake?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tammy says:

      Thank you. This is very well stated. God works in every individual in his own time and his own way. It is not our job to change people. It is simply our job to love and let Him do the moving. Very well worded.

      Like

    • Mike says:

      Well said, K. C.,
      If we can discriminate between drinking and drunkenness, can we do the same for homosexual thought and homosexual conduct?

      Like

  41. bnbliss says:

    Beautiful article. Speaking as a gay non-Christian it is my understanding that Jesus didn’t pick and choose who his sacrifice on the cross covered. Doesn’t his example of Love on the cross apply to serving everyone in love without first considering (judging) their sin?

    Like

  42. Annette says:

    Absolutely excellently argued!

    Like

  43. Candice says:

    First of all, I can’t bake. So I will never be put in this particular predicament. However, I must say that if a Christian is going to discriminate against the actions of a couple which they find sinful (ie, homosexual union), then they must also ask every individual who comes in to buy a cake if they have been having sex before the wedding (gay or straight). They must also ask if they have ever committed murder, stolen, had an abortion, etc. Singling out one particular sin and holding it as more sinful somehow than any other sin, makes us Pharisees and unworthy to be called followers of Jesus. All that being said, as a Christian, I am called to seek God for the actual relationships that I am actually surrounded by. It is good to pontificate and ponder and philosophize, but let us be cautious not to generalize too far or we will forget that our conscience, aka the Holy Spirit, is our true guide for moral decision making.

    Like

  44. tonyh16 says:

    Are you forcing one to a standard that may be true but they are not yet able to accept it as was with those to who Paul wrote to in Rome “As for the one who is weak in faith, welcome him, but not to quarrel over opinions. 2 One person believes he may eat anything, while the weak person eats only vegetables. 3 Let not the one who eats despise the one who abstains, and let not the one who abstains pass judgment on the one who eats, for God has welcomed him” He should not be forced to do that which he believes is wrong . There is a lot of scripture to back him up 2John “If anyone comes to you and does not bring this teaching, do not receive him into your house or give him any greeting, 11 for whoever greets him takes part in his wicked works.”

    Like

  45. Sandra Rea says:

    Good post. I have to admit I clicked on the link in someone’s feed because I was getting to be really upset. But pleasantly you have your head on straight. You used your words well. More people should be willing to be more open in their views. I don’t expect it, but hey… we can try. And on here someone made the comment of attending the wedding and offering to wash everyone’s feet. Excellent point. I don’t think the media should be the voice of Christians everywhere. I’ve met my fair share of stiff, by-the-Book Christians, but a lot of them haven’t even gotten through the Book. They just take what they’ve heard and regurgitate incorrectly. I don’t know about their God, but mine is one of love and light. Thank you for the good post. I’m glad I clicked and read it!

    Like

  46. shadowofagreatrock says:

    I too felt compelled to respond by writing. People don’t really understand the Gospel if they start qualifying and quantifying sin. I had to respond by what Jesus did. I think the old WWJD is long gone and forgotten. If interested its at http://thechurchofhardknocks.com/serve-gay-wedding-god-telling/

    Like

  47. Jennifer says:

    Here’s my “Christian” response to homosexuality – Jesus commanded you to “Love One Another” (period). Not to love those who are like you or only those that you agree with. A homosexual relationship, whether you support it or not, is not your problem. Your challenge from God is to love them despite how you feel about it. Even if you think it’s a sin – it’s not your sin. Your sin is judging and not loving. Like Mother Theresa said – in the end what happens here was never between you and them anyway. Don’t worry about whether or not other people are obeying – worry about whether or not you are.

    Like

  48. James says:

    Thank you for this post. This certainly gives me a new perspective to think about, and will probably do the same for others. Jewish people in the time Jesus shared this teaching could certainly be compelled to carry burdens they did not support or that were contrary to the Law. Idols, pork and the list could probably continue. Jesus didn’t list any of those things as exceptions to His teaching, though. Simon of Cyrene was compelled to bear Christ’s cross using this very Roman law. I would think that bearing the execution instrument of a person would have violated Simon’s conscience, as it probably would all of ours. Yet I think he was following Christ’s teachings in his actions of carrying the Cross. I think, though, that if some people don’t interpret this particular teaching of Jesus’ to apply to baking cakes for gay weddings, or interpret it so but choose not to follow it, we should not use secular law or government to force them to do so. The teaching’s of Christ should be something that people choose to follow of their own will, not something forced on them by our government. Thank you again for the well presented position.

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  49. […] this month, a blogger poster her thoughts on the highly debated issue of gay marriage and what should be the proper Christian response. More […]

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